Link

(Source: fascinasians, via homoarigato)

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copsandgobblers:

my school is talking about internet safety or something

(Source: buttpregnant, via femme-mermaid27)

Tags: yup racism
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nativeamericannews:

‘Watch Your Red-skinned Back’—Racist Notes Surface in California Schools
Notes reading “Watch Your Redskinned Back” and “White Pride Bitch” were left March 4 in the lockers of two Pit River Tribe students at a Northern California high school where parents have alleged for months there is systemic, racially charged abuse of their children.

nativeamericannews:

‘Watch Your Red-skinned Back’—Racist Notes Surface in California Schools

Notes reading “Watch Your Redskinned Back” and “White Pride Bitch” were left March 4 in the lockers of two Pit River Tribe students at a Northern California high school where parents have alleged for months there is systemic, racially charged abuse of their children.


(Source: indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com, via nayyirahwaheed)

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atane:

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.
The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

atane:

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.

The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

(via monaeltahawy)

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"I need the gay community to STOP comparing our struggle to the Black Civil Rights Movement. You DON’T get to draw that comparison and then remain SILENT when the civil rights of Black teens are being violated. I mean, where the fuck are y’all?!?! Yay! For Ellen Page coming out at an lgbt youth conference. I was there. I sang right after. But THAT should not have been our focus yesterday. How in the hell are we having conferences to inspire our youth to live their truths and then have absolutely nothing to offer to THIS conversation???? Dear White Gays, I am HEARTBROKEN by your continued silence on these issues and I DO NOT give you permission to high jack the Civil Rights Movement while simultaneously IGNORING the inequalites that youth of color face every fucking day. It is culturally insensitive to do so and we are either fighting for EQUALITY for ALL or we aren’t. As an LGBT woman of color, I am having an extremely difficult time grasping WHY Matthew Shephard’s life is so much more valuable than Trayvon’s or Jordan’s????!?!?! Help me understand, y’all! Help me understand."

Frenchie Davis exposes a simmering frustration many African Americans have with the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.  (via odinsblog)

(via bookishboi)

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theultraintrovert:

sancophaleague:

The Move Organization is a Black Liberation group from Philadelphia started by John Africa in 1972. According to the group, the word MOVE is not an acronym. It means exactly what it says: MOVE, work, generate, be active. Their philosophy is everything that’s alive moves and If it didn’t, it would be stagnant, dead. Movement is their principle of Life.  Self Defense is also one of their principles of life and On May 13, 1985 they definitely showed that. The confrontation began when police came to their house over 100 strong with guns aimed and demanded the MOVE members come outside. Still angry from the 1978 confrontation with police, which resulted in 9 MOVE members being sentenced to 30 to 100 years in prison, they refused. The police then began throwing tear gas and opening fire at the house. The MOVE house had been built as a bunker and they began shooting back. After hours of shooting, the Police called for a helicopter and dropped a BOMB on the house. Yup, you read right. The cops dropped a bomb in the middle of a neighborhood in Philly. It’s Crazy how far America will go to subdue Black people. After the bomb dropped, 65 homes were destroyed and 11 people including 5 small children were killed. As the survivors of the MOVE house began to surrender, police continued to open fire at them with automatic weapons. One of the MOVE children actually ran into a burning house to avoid being shot by police. She would later be found burned to death. There is a great documentary that was released that illustrates the constant police brutality they faced and the bombing.
Today 29 years later, the MOVE 9, like many other black political prisoners, continue to sit in Prison and each year they are denied the right to parole. In a system that has always been so hell bent against us, one must wonder, When Will We Overcome?
 “Revolution starts with the individual. It starts with a person making a personal commitment to do what’s right. You can’t turn someone into a revolutionary by making them chant slogans or wave guns. To understand revolution, you must be sound. Revolution is not imposed upon another, it is kindled within them. A person can talk about revolution, but if they are still worshiping money, or putting drugs into their body, they obviously haven’t committed themselves to doing what’s right. Revolution is not a philosophy, it is an activity.” MOVE
Post by @KingKwajo

I just learned about this when Rameka Afrika was at my school

(via sexgenderbody)

Link

selchieproductions:

There’s a long tradition of fetishising the idea of the green native in Western thinking. To the Western mind indigenous people are seen as rooted, as connected to a now gone but ultimately easier, greener time, all this in an era which according to the same school of…

(via blackgreens)

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gradientlair:

So there’s this thing that I’ve always known about, that @Karynthia, @Blackamazon, @so_treu @weseerace and @bad_dominicana discuss often, about how terms, ideas and scholarship that Black women create are not associated with their originators or even with any Black women at all (and not even speaking of just plagiarism; I mean erasure). Or worse, they’re used against Black women. Or even worse, people actively fight the terms’ existences especially within mainstream feminism.
Womanism. Intersectionality. Matrix of domination. Misogynoir. Four of the many concepts that are fought tooth and nail to not exist (especially the latter since it’s newest). Subject to the scrutiny of imperialist White supremacist capitalist patriarchy (this is bell hooks’ combined term) and how it shapes epistemology. Eventually once accepted, then they are disconnected from its originators often for the purpose of silencing other Black women. There’s people who use the terms and ideas to push their agenda (agendas that usually exclude Black women) yet none of the originators are anywhere on their sites. No tags. Not mentioned in conversation or teaching. Nowhere. And even when they discuss modern issues in feminism, they refuse to name Black women currently doing the work. They gladly name any White woman they’re referring to. 
This is not about Black women wanting “White approval” as utterly boring and predictable Whites and some Black men (who also try to silence Black women with other Black women’s words) will suggest, a notion I already deconstructed in the past. It’s about a long history of taking and erasure. Taking. Erasure. This has a history as certain aspects of Black progressive politics are regularly appropriated and then used by Whites to shame or exclude Black people. 
Anytime I mention Black women’s work, all of a sudden it becomes “unethical” or “greedy” to credit our work or idea spreading and education is deemed “impossible” if our names, contributions, ideas and praxis are mentioned. I am fascinated by multi-degreed, multiple column-writing White feminists who can’t figure out who coined “intersectionality” or what it actually means. This is willful ignorance shaped by a need to erase Black women’s work/relevance in feminism on the surface and marginalizes Black women, in general. 

gradientlair:

So there’s this thing that I’ve always known about, that @Karynthia, @Blackamazon, @so_treu @weseerace and @bad_dominicana discuss often, about how terms, ideas and scholarship that Black women create are not associated with their originators or even with any Black women at all (and not even speaking of just plagiarism; I mean erasure). Or worse, they’re used against Black women. Or even worse, people actively fight the terms’ existences especially within mainstream feminism.

Womanism. Intersectionality. Matrix of domination. Misogynoir. Four of the many concepts that are fought tooth and nail to not exist (especially the latter since it’s newest). Subject to the scrutiny of imperialist White supremacist capitalist patriarchy (this is bell hooks’ combined term) and how it shapes epistemology. Eventually once accepted, then they are disconnected from its originators often for the purpose of silencing other Black women. There’s people who use the terms and ideas to push their agenda (agendas that usually exclude Black women) yet none of the originators are anywhere on their sites. No tags. Not mentioned in conversation or teaching. Nowhere. And even when they discuss modern issues in feminism, they refuse to name Black women currently doing the work. They gladly name any White woman they’re referring to. 

This is not about Black women wanting “White approval” as utterly boring and predictable Whites and some Black men (who also try to silence Black women with other Black women’s words) will suggest, a notion I already deconstructed in the past. It’s about a long history of taking and erasure. Taking. Erasure. This has a history as certain aspects of Black progressive politics are regularly appropriated and then used by Whites to shame or exclude Black people. 

Anytime I mention Black women’s work, all of a sudden it becomes “unethical” or “greedy” to credit our work or idea spreading and education is deemed “impossible” if our names, contributions, ideas and praxis are mentioned. I am fascinated by multi-degreed, multiple column-writing White feminists who can’t figure out who coined “intersectionality” or what it actually means. This is willful ignorance shaped by a need to erase Black women’s work/relevance in feminism on the surface and marginalizes Black women, in general. 

(via buttcuddler)

Text

Most upsetting thing I’ve learned this semester: African Americans took thirty years to establish Seneca Village, NYC as an autonomous village with churches, homes, organizations where they could have freedom and exert political control. The village was destroyed by white backlash culminating in the creation of Central Park, which successfully erased it from the city’s history.

gwendolynfaker:

theblackamericanprincess:

niggaimdeadass:

babybutta:

The fucking tears in my eyes right now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seneca_Village

http://projects.ilt.columbia.edu/seneca/start.html

See; Africville.

(Source: msdeonb, via sexgenderbody)

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thehealthywarrior:

Britain’s first black marchioness

Okay y’all. 

This is: Emma McQuiston

And as that says, she’s this first black marchioness Britain has ever had. 

But she’s not the only black royal

but THIS IS A BIG DEAL.

plus she’s getting snubbed like big time. The groom’s father didn’t even come. And she said things like: 

she has been snubbed by the British elite because of her ethnicity and background

which is fucking stupid cause who do those inbred fuckers think they are snubbing people and shit.

SO REBLOG IT, CAUSE SHE’S GORGEOUS AND EVERYONE SHOULD LOVE HER.

the monarchy, barftastically relevant to my interests since 2006

(via dancingwithdiversity)

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beerhell:

freedominwickedness:

bapgeek:

they outlawed this move just because she was the only woman who could do it. 

Surya Bonaly was infamous for (among other things) doing a one blade backflip in the 1998 Olympics, and is the ONLY figure skater who’s ever pulled that off. Not just the only woman, the only figure skater PERIOD. There’s like all of three Olympic-class male skaters who did backflips in their routines, and NONE of them could do it one blade.

But wait, there’s more.

Backflips were banned from the 1976 Olympics onward on the official justification that skating jumps are supposed to be landed on one blade, whereas backflips are landed on both blades. The unofficial justification was it was too dangerous, both to the athlete and to the rink — if you didn’t land it perfectly, you could not only break your ankle, but also punch THROUGH the ice surface.

Surya Bonaly was openly contemptuous of the figure skating judges, because they were a bunch of openly racist white men who always screwed her over by giving her lower scores than she deserved. That one-blade backflip was her ultimate FUCK YOU! to the Olympics judges, because she took an “illegal” backflip and made it legal by landing it on one blade. Pretty much DARING them to mark her down for being epic awesome and pulling a move that their precious coddled white girls didn’t have the guts to even think about.

They did, of course. White racism knows no bounds. But she utterly owned them with that move.

not only did she do a fucking backflip and land, she landed then went right into a triple loop. like holy fuck

(Source: miss-rae-rae, via deserthooker)

Quote
"Puppy’s murder made me aware that we were not safe or untouchable and that if someone does touch us, no one gives a shit. We only have each other. We always knew this, but now we needed to take a step towards doing something about it. So I started looking out for myself and the girls who worked on the street with me. We girls decided that whenever we got into a car with someone, another girl would write down as much information as possible. We would try not to just lean into the car window but get a guy to walk outside the car so that everyone could see him, so we all knew who he was if she didn’t come back. That’s how it started. Since no one was going to do it for us, we had to do it for ourselves."

Miss Major, Black trans woman and former sex worker discussing the killing of a fellow sex worker (via theraceproblem)

TWoC resistance and community building is foundational. Do you see the creativity that goes into our survival? There’s so much I can say about the agency and interconnectedness that comes from securing our survival.

(via mocosyamores)

(via tgstonebutch)

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tranqualizer:

i was riding the train back to beacon hill today and was sitting in the row reserved for the elderly and disabled folks and a few minutes later a man of color (who told me specifically he is mixed black, mexican and white) asked if it was cool for him to join me. i say no prob because it’s not a crowded train and whatevs, like it’s nice he asked. 

so he sits down then he starts making conversation with a white woman sitting across from him whose on her way to airport and has this really big pink suitcase. he compliments her on her suitcase and she becomes really blatantly annoyed with him and ignores him completely. it’s understandable; women don’t catch a break from men on the transit, on the streets, in public, ever. it’s understandable but it’s also a case of men of color being profiled by white women as predators and violent, etc. 

so a few minutes later he turns to me and compliments me on my glasses. we talk and he’s telling me about the headache he is getting when he puts on his glasses now so he switched to contact lenses. then i tell him about where i got my glasses and he should check it out so he doesn’t pay $300 for some glasses again. then he talks to me about going to seattle university and this tattoo of a rosary he got. 

it’s my stop coming up and he says to me “stay sharp! god bless you! have a good day” and i return that warmth to him. 

like sometimes people on public transit just need someone to talk to. and if it’s not hurting me to have a conversation with someone i’ll do it. i’m annoyed with men on public transit pretty often, for how much space they take up and how much of other people’s time they feel entitled to but in between a lot of that shit is just people who need someone to talk to. 

i’m saying this as a masculine presenting light skinned person of color. and i’m saying this is someone who is often read as lesbian and non-threatening because of a visible disability. public spaces are difficult and i am definitely forever suspicious of white women who contribute to the stigmatization and assumed violence of men of color.